University of Mississippi

Archives for August 2016

Night Sun: Curated by Philip R. Jackson

Our very own Phillip Jackson has curated an exhibit for Southside Art Gallery!
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Reception is set for Thursday, September 8th from 6-8pm
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Night Sun: Curated by Philip R. Jackson

Southside Gallery is pleased to announce Night Sun, a group exhibition of paintings curated by Philip R. Jackson that will take place from August 16th to September 10th, 2016. There will be an artists’ reception on Thursday, September 8th from 6 to 8 pm.

Curator Philip R. Jackson is an Associate Professor of Art at the University of Mississippi, where he teaches and heads the painting program. The works included in Night Sun depict subjects observed under artificial light. Jackson writes of the exhibition, “Here light becomes the lifeblood of a painting; its illuminated effect is metaphysical in translation and abstract in revelation. Each artist explores its distinct affects, transforming commonplace subjects into lasting impressions.”

Most of the artists included in the exhibition are members of the Perceptual Painters Collective, founded in 2008 by Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts graduates David Campbell and Brian Rego. They are Victoria Barnes, Logan Blanco, David Campbell, Tim Conte, Elizabeth and Philip Geiger, David Jewell, Matt Klos, John Lee, Aaron Lubrick, Andrew Patterson-Tutschka, Brian Rego, Erin Raedeke, and Peter Van Dyck. Other artists not a part of the collective who will also be exhibiting include Neil Callander, Matthew Lopas, Benny Melton, Marcus Michels, and Joseph Morzuch.

According to founding member Brian Rego, Perceptual Painting involves acquiring and cultivating a visual language derived from sensation, memory, and imagination. While painting from life is essential to the practice, Perceptual Painting takes a more analytical approach to mimesis. It does not, in contrast to photography, replicate exact reality, but conveys “experiential reality” through stylistic manipulations of form. The Perceptual Painters try to capture form in flux—as living and shifting—establishing, in effect, a more direct relationship between the act of painting and the painting itself.