University of Mississippi

Brooke White

Assistant Chair, Associate Professor of Art
Imaging Arts

MFA, Cornell University
BFA, Alfred University
email: brookew@olemiss.edu
website: www.brookecwhite.net

 

 

Brooke White is both a practicing artist and an educator who specializes in fine art photography. White has exhibited her photographs and videos nationally and internationally including the Hammer Museum in Los Angeles, the Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts in Omaha, NE, MASSMoCA and the DiVA Art Fair in New York, Paris and Berlin. Much of her work, both photographic and video, is created while traveling in areas such as East Africa, South East Asia, South America and the deep south of the United States.

White’s work analyzes the ways in which disease, tourism, agriculture and politics effect our connection to the landscape. Most recently White has been photographing in Central Asia looking at the ways that globalization effects our connection to place and the landscape. White’s work combines cutting edge digital strategies found in the most contemporary photography today with traditional imaging techniques used in black and white photography.

Over the years White has received several grants and residencies, which have helped her pursue her artwork in various parts of the world. Most recently she was the recipient of a Fulbright Senior Research Scholar in Bangalore, India where she was a Visiting Artist at the Center for Experimental Media at the Srishti School of Art, Design and Technology.

As an educator White teaches traditional Black and White photography, digital photography, digital video, alternative photographic processes and large format digital printing at the graduate and undergraduate level. In the classroom White encourages a cross-disciplinary approach to art making that combines traditional analog techniques with the newest digital strategies. White is concerned with bringing together practice, concept and context and through thematically based project students gain an understanding of the past, present and future of lens based image making.